Adjectives for Seeds | Words to describe Seeds

  • Dry
  • Little
  • Good
  • Ripe
  • Potato
  • Sweet
  • Light
  • Secret
  • Pine
  • Fresh
  • Large
  • Wind-Blown
  • Own
  • Many
  • Small
  • Such
  • Strong
  • Bright-Red
  • Melon-Like
  • Red
  • First
  • How do you describe Seeds?

    • 1. The cones are abundant; the seeds numerous, winged for flight, retaining their vitality longer than most pine seeds. 🔊
    • 2. The large seeds are very nutritious, and form an important article of diet among the northern Indians. 🔊
    • 3. Before the foliage is full grown, the light seeds, each a minute speck, floats away in a wisp of silky down. 🔊
    • 4. At sunrise, the blue-jays and other birds gathered about the door and garden, to pick the dry seeds that the weeds were shedding on the earth. 🔊
    • 5. It is difficult to believe that some of the large trees we see, sprung from small seeds; yet it is true that all trees started in this manner. 🔊
    • 6. And over the land your seed shall spring up and grow, and have good stalks and many flowers, and have good wide leaves and heads of good seeds. 🔊
    • 7. Shall we, then, say that he who possesses the science of justice, honour, and goodness, has less intelligence than the gardener for his own seeds? 🔊
    • 8. These are disseminated by birds which have swallowed but have not digested such seeds, and in an analogous manner the great tape-worm group becomes also widely diffused. 🔊
    • 9. The outer end is often ornamented by straight incised lines or with red seeds affixed with wax or with a small piece of a cheap glass mirror roughly inlaid. 🔊
    • 10. It consisted of a rattan foundation encircling the head, covered with blackened beeswax studded with three parallel rows of encircling bright-red seeds. 🔊
    • 11. I planted a good many seeds I got from the Yokahama Nursery Company, and the nuts were rather inferior as to size. 🔊
    • 12. Under the circumstances it does not seem unreasonable to suppose that the first seeds of Christianity were in this way brought into Britain through Cornwall. 🔊
    • 13. Large, strong seeds like corn, peas, etc., which do not lift their cotyledons above the surface, can be planted with safety at a depth of from one to four or five inches. 🔊
    • 14. The cones, horny-tipped, dark purple, one to three inches long, are ripe in August; the large sweet seeds are gathered and eaten by Indians. 🔊
    • 15. Possibly recurring burns swept the area many times before wind-blown seeds began to start advance groups of fir, which, when fifteen or twenty years old, themselves fruited and filled the blanks between them. 🔊
    • 16. Sometimes the Italians roast the barely ripe cone, dashing it on the ground to break it open, but the ripe seeds of the older cone when it naturally opens are better worth eating. 🔊
    • 17. The Furies' source, fair-hair'd, whose frame proceeds From Jove's ineffable and secret seeds. 🔊
    • 18. But Toehahvs said he had made these dolls so for good purpose, for if anybody gave them small seeds they would not slip between their fingers, and they could use the webs for dippers to drink with. 🔊
    • 19. There may be potato seeds, that come when the potato blossom dries up, for all I know, but I have always planted the eyes of the tubers and so does everyone else. 🔊
    • 20. The roots in the basket dried away, and died for want of water; but the earth that Bessie had dug with them was full of little seeds, which had been hiding in the dark for years, awaiting their chance to grow. 🔊
    • 21. The pointed cones differ in form, however, and the soft mellow flesh, with its melon-like seeds and leathery calyx at base, mark this fruit as still a novelty in the East. 🔊
    • 22. With Cesca looking on sardonically, Molly poured fresh seeds on her rude metate and showed Rhoda the grinding roll that flattened and broke the little grains. 🔊
    • 23. In a later age it is possible that the first seeds of Christianity may have come to Britain by way of Cornwall along the trade route created by the exportation of the products of the Cornish Tin Mines to Marseilles. 🔊

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