Hebraic In A Sentence

How To Use Hebraic In A Sentence?

  • In the dignity and simplicity of the old backwoodsman there is something almost Hebraic.
  • The necessity of marriage was one of the six hundred and thirteen Hebraic precepts.
  • Their Jewish Messiah, literal, national, hebraic, was not an attractive personage to his mind.
  • He, however, gives a new direction to the Platonic theory, owing to his Hebraic conception of God.
  • It has never been able to shake off the Hebraic taint of filth which it inherits from the ancestral thoroughfare.
  • None the less his view of the universe is an intellectual expression of the Hebraic monotheism, which unites a religious with a scientific monism.
  • Again a contrast is pointed between the seriousness of the Hebraic and the levity of the Greek attitude towards literature.
  • In the later Hebraic literature the representation of woman as a house, the door taking the place of the sex opening, is very widespread.
  • The ancient Hebraic tribe under which he would be classed was that of Asher, and the ruling angel of the sign is Asmodel.
  • It is a vulgarity for one thing, and for another typifies the Hebraic week-end, when the sons and daughters of Judah descend upon the town.
  • The apocryphal books of the Old Testament lodge the ancient Hebraic idea in the very heart of the New.
  • He was lean and angular, with features of a pronounced Hebraic cast and a pair of beady black eyes that conveyed the impression of mingled cunning and humour.
  • Then as long as play lasts there is a concentration of dark hebraic eyes on the table, which would seem to draw the gold pieces lying there as if by an invisible thread....
  • Karl Marx devoted his typically Jewish genius to the exposition of Socialist theories, but the theories themselves were not of Hebraic origin.
  • Philo spoke in the language of the intellectual world of his day, and strove to associate the intellectual precepts of Hellenism with the Hebraic passion for righteousness.
  • He must have found it somewhere among the dusty trumpery of forgotten old folk-lyrics, and when he sang it one caught the force of the Hebraic simile about the crackling of thorns under a pot.
  • In the sayings of Jesus we have the Hebraic strain, but in Luke and John and the Epistles the mingling of cultures.
  • He divided them into twenty-two books, according to the number of the Hebraic letters, and wrote several other books, whose doctrine was to be revealed to the learned men alone.
  • But philosophy in the third century debased itself in order to support the tottering polytheistic religion of the pagan world against the modified Hebraic creed, Christianity, which was fast demolishing its power.
  • The composition is bad: Jacques, a figure without grace of expression, sprawls in a comedy landscape and the features of the wounded deer hav a strong Hebraic cast.
  • It was true: each Jarmuthian clearly betrayed his Hebraic origin in huge, fleshy nose and pendulous lower lip, so characteristic of the Semitic race.
  • Pieter van der Werff has a Repentant Magdalen, who is kneeling in a grotto with hands crossed on her breast, while she reads a parchment scroll covered with Hebraic characters.
  • A complete harmony between the Hellenic and the Hebraic outlook upon life was impossible, but Philo at least accomplished a harmony between Hebraic monotheism and Greek metaphysics.
  • In Philo, as we have seen, the Hebraic and Hellenic conceptions of God touch at their summits in their noblest expressions; the conceptions of Plato are interfused with the imagination of the prophets.
  • But the greatest genius of the Hellenic race, influenced perhaps by contact with Oriental peoples, possessed, in a remarkable degree, the Hebraic spirit, which is zealous for God and makes for righteousness.
  • Another part of the explanation is that the strong Biblical and Hebraic element in Milton's character does seem to have increased in strength during his later years.
  • It bears all the traces of the pseudepigraphic tendency of a period that produced the first works of the Cabala, the Seder Olam Zutta of Rabbi Joshua, and the neo-Hebraic apocalypses.
  • And his constant study of the Apocalypse and the Hebraic revelations--it has filled him with strange notions.
  • The Hebraic God, like the Greek First Being, has no qualities, but unlike the other He has ethical attributes, and it is by these that we know Him and by these that He is related to the universe and to man.
  • In fact, he chooses out only the valuable parts of Greek thought, which could enter into a true harmony with the Hebraic spirit; and he not only rejects, but he attacks unsparingly those elements which were antagonistic to holiness and righteousness.
  • His Hebraic mind, even when fortified by the mastery of philosophy, was unable to present its ideas systematically; it passed from subject to subject, weaving the whole together only by the thread of a continuous commentary upon Genesis.
  • At the time he had marked the parity of the observance with the Hebraic usage, and he intended to make an examination into the origin of the curious tradition of the identity of the American Indians with the lost tribes of Israel.
  • Be this as it may, it is certain that the version facilitated the introduction of Greek philosophy into the interpretation of Scripture, and gave a new meaning to certain Hebraic conceptions, by suggesting comparison with strange notions.
  • It is the apotheosis of ham and cheese, at which only the Hebraic nose, doing violence to its natural curve, turns up in scorn; while true Christians crowd around it to wonder and admire, and sometimes to venture in upon the almost enchanted ground.
  • In the one case allegory was a genuine development, and might have been adopted by the original prophet: in the other, it was reconstruction; and the artificial un-Hebraic character of the Hellenistic commentary was one of the causes of its disappearance from Jewish tradition.
  • These fancies and interpretations indicate that in Palestine as well as in Alexandria an idealistic theology and a religious metaphysics were developing at this period, though in the East it was more imaginative, more Hebraic, more in the spirit of the old prophets.

Short & Simple Example Sentence For Hebraic | Hebraic Sentence

  • His features are distinctly Hebraic.
  • The whole inspiration of Hebraic religion lies in that.
  • Greek philosophy combined with Hebraic moral principles!
  • The Hebraic religion and our modern education

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