Were in a sentence 🔊

Definition of Were

second-person singular simple past indicative of be | first/second/third-person plural simple past indicative of be | all-person simple imperfect subjunctive of be

Short Example Sentence for Were

  • 1. They were all three plainsmen. 🔊
  • 2. Hills of any size whatever were quite strange to them. 🔊
  • 3. These were not, in strictness, the penalty of the law. 🔊
  • 4. We were full of brains in that Lhassa column. 🔊
  • 5. My orders were to go to Gnatong as a temporary measure. 🔊
  • 6. They were given to him by the Author of every good and perfect gift. 🔊

How to use Were in Sentence?

  • 1. Notwithstanding the claims of divine justice, all were not reprobated and doomed to eternal death. 🔊
  • 2. Some were doubtless impressed, and went away enthusiastic about that young warrior. 🔊
  • 3. Life and death were set before him, and he had the power to stand, as well as the power to fall. 🔊
  • 4. I got into a small drift once, my pony flopping down suddenly till his girths were in the snow. 🔊
  • 5. Such objections, as is well known, were raised before astronomy, as a science, had an existence. 🔊
  • 6. It is as if a needle touched with the loadstone were sensible of and pleased with its turning toward the north. 🔊
  • 7. This were to seek a ground and reason of that which has no existence, except in the imagination of man. 🔊
  • 8. But if he had a disposition to love most those things that were inferior and less worthy, then his dispositions were vicious. 🔊
  • 9. Hence this holiness, after all the means and the ability were given to him, must be left to the will of the creature himself. 🔊
  • 10. Perhaps they were intended as the ornaments of faith, rather than as the radiant armour and the invincible weapons of reason. 🔊
  • 11. There were several detached officers also waiting here, and the units forming the reinforcements were coming in daily. 🔊
  • 12. It appeared that we were occupying what was on the whole a straggling but quite a fashionable part of London. 🔊
  • 13. Who can say that it would be better for the universe, on the whole, if the punishment of sin were limited than if it were eternal? 🔊
  • 14. He was also so constituted, that certain earthly objects were agreeable to him, and excited his natural appetites and desires. 🔊
  • 15. The language he employs often represents the facts of nature, but not facts as they would be, if his system were true. 🔊
  • 16. There was also a lot of sorting and packing to be done, and farewell visits to be made, where these were officially expected of one. 🔊
  • 17. But in this case, let us not chide our poor lost brother with pride and presumption, as if we ourselves were unstained with the same sin. 🔊
  • 18. According to this admission, they were not necessary, and consequently not consistent with the goodness of God. 🔊
  • 19. They turned wild eyes of anguish and reproach towards me whenever I waited to see how they were getting on. 🔊
  • 20. It has been thought that if the goodness of God were unlimited and impartial, the light and blessings of revelation would be universal. 🔊
  • 21. Hence the materials were wanting out of which to construct a Theodicy, or vindication of the perfections of God. 🔊
  • 22. He answers these questions precisely as they were answered by Luther and Calvin more than a hundred years before his time. 🔊
  • 23. It is not, indeed, to be dissembled, that it were a difficulty to determine, whether such foresight were, for himself, better or worse. 🔊
  • 24. In relation to the holy actions of men, all the praise is due to God, say they, because they were produced by his power. 🔊
  • 25. If there were any force in such analogies, they would conclude quite as much against the scheme of Dr. Channing as against ours. 🔊
  • 26. Augustine, as is well known, maintained the startling paradox, that all mankind were present in Adam, and sinned in him. 🔊
  • 27. If this were all that M. Leibnitz had to offer, he might as well have believed, and remained silent. 🔊
  • 28. It is very true, that no man would be accountable for his external actions or their consequences, if there were no fixed relation between these and his volitions. 🔊
  • 29. According to the system of Edwards, as well as that of his opponents, sin would not have been committed unless it were permitted by God. 🔊
  • 30. This scheme of imputation, so far from being an expression of infinite goodness, were indeed an exhibition of the most frightful cruelty and injustice. 🔊
  • 31. If nothing more were intended by such an objection, than to put the reader on his guard against the prejudice in favour of novelty, we could not complain of it. 🔊
  • 32. Supposing God to possess perfect holiness, he would certainly prevent all moral evil, says the atheist, unless his power were limited. 🔊
  • 33. His logic is good; but even an illogical escape from such a conclusion were better than the rejection of one of the great fundamental doctrines of revealed religion. 🔊
  • 34. If such knowledge were possessed in the greatest possible perfection, we have no reason to believe that our insight into the relation between the human and the divine power would be at all improved. 🔊